– American Institute of Homoeopathy, 65th Session, 1910,
 California.

usahomeopathy Institutions in which Homoeopathy is employed in United States

Armitage Home, San Mateo, Cal. No report has been received from this institution this year. At last report the executive officer was L. A. Wadham, M. D., 530 California Street, San Francisco, Cal.
 Maria Kip Orphanage, San Francisco, Cal. Incorporated 1870. Opened for patients 1890. Executive officer, Mrs. Woodward, Bush and Scott Streets, San Francisco, Cal. Number of beds, 120; number of patients treated during the last year, 40. Supported by state aid. Delegate, Sidney Worth, M. D., attending physician.
 San Francisco Nursery for Homeless Children, San Francisco, Cal. Incorporated 1892. Opened for inmates 1878. Executive officer, Mrs. J. Bertz, San Francisco Nursery for Homeless Children, Fourteenth and Lake Streets, San Francisco, Cal. Number of beds, 80; number of patients treated during the last year, 142. Supported by charity, and board of children, and state aid for orphans and half orphans. Delegate, Guy E. Manning, M. D.
 Colorado.
 Belle Lenox Nursery, Denver, Col. Opened for inmates 1897. Executive officer, Reverend A. C. Peck, 1406 Ogden Avenue, Denver, Col. Number of beds, 79. Number of patients treated last year, 60. Supported by board of inmates and donations. Delegate, J. P. Willard, M. D.
 The Clifton Hughes Training School for Girls, Montclair, Denver, Col. Opened for inmates 1893. Incorporated 1893. Executive officer, Reverend A. C. Peck, 1406 Ogden Avenue, Denver, Col. Number of beds, 100. Supported by board of inmates and donations. Delegate, J. P. Willard, M. D. The change in name and place goes into effect January 1, 1910.
 Colorado Industrial School for Boys, Golden, Col. Opened for inmates 1881. Not incorporated. Superintendent, Frederick L. Paddleford, Golden, Col. Number of beds in hospital, 12; in school, 360; number of patients treated during the last year, 215; number of prescriptions made, 1,478. This is a state institution and receives a state appropriation. Walter Joel King, M. D., attending physician. No deaths.
 Illinois.
 Chicago Nursery and Half Orphan Asylum, 175 Burling Street, Chicago, Ill. Incorporated 1865. Opened for inmates 1850. Executive officer, Mrs. Cyrus Bentley, Jr., Elmhurst, Ill. Number of beds, 200; average number of children kept, 167. Supported by endowment funds and donations.
 Chicago Foundlings’ Home for Mothers and Infants, 15 South Wood Street, Chicago, Ill. Incorporated 1872. Opened for inmates 1871. Superintendent, Miss Frances C. Shipmann, 120 South Wood Street, Chicago, Ill. Number of beds for mothers, 40; can care for 60 babies; number of patients treated during the last year, 622, of which 325 were adults, 297 were infants. Supported by voluntary contributions and a small endowment fund.
 Illinois Asylum for Feeble Minded Children, Chicago, Ill. Opened for inmates 1885. We know nothing about this asylum, as we have been unable to obtain a report for several years.
 Illinois Masonic Home, Chicago, Ill. Incorporated 1884. Opened for inmates 1885. Executive officer, C. S. Gurney, M. D., 921 Dearborn Ave-Chicago, Ill. Number of beds, 80. Supported by the Grand Lodge of the State of Illinois. Attending physician, E. C. Sweet, M. D., Masonic Temple, Chicago.
 Women’s Model Lodging House, 3040 Calumet Avenue, Chicago, Ill. Incorporated 1893. Opened for inmates 1893. Executive officer, Mrs. Richard N. Gray, Chicago Beach Hotel, Chicago, Ill. Number of beds, 35. Supported by the Women’s Clubs of Cook Co., Ill. Delegate, Christine Bergolth, M. D.
 Home for the Friendless, Chicago, Ill. Established 1859. For thirty years attending physician has been a homoeopath. A. C. Bartlett, President of the Board. Attending physician and delegate, Sarah M. Hobson, M. D., 700 Marshall Field Building, Chicago, Ill.
 Indiana.
 Old Ladies’ Home, New Albany, Ind. Opened for patients 1870. Not incorporated. Executive officer, Miss Mary Baldwin, Matron. New Albany, Ind. Number of beds, 14. Supported by endowment fund. Attending physician, G: Oscar Erni, M. D., 807 East Spring Street, New Albany, Ind.
 Iowa.
 Home for the Friendless, Cedar Rapids, Ia. Incorporated 1886. Opened for inmates 1884. President, Mrs. Emma M. Van Vechtin, Cedar Rapids, Ia. Number of beds for children, 60; 10 for Juvenile Court cases. Supported by voluntary contributions and county appropriation. Delegate, Charles H. Cogswell, M. D. For six months we have had the care of the children from the Juvenile Court. Is doing splendid work.
 Iowa School for the Deaf, Council Bluffs, Ia. Opened for inmates 1856. Incorporated 1856. Superintendent, Henry W. Rothert, M. D., Council Bluffs, Ia. Number of beds, 12; number of patients treated during the last year, 150. Supported by state appropriation. Attending physician, Alfred P. Hanchett, M. D.
 Benedict Home, Des Moines, Ia. Incorporated 1882. Opened for inmates 1882. Superintendent, Hattie R. Garrison, Third and Forest Avenues, Des Moines, Ia. Number of beds, 43; number of patients treated during the past year, 46 girls, 38 babies. Supported by state aid and voluntary contributions. Delegate, Jennie A. Colemann, M. D.
 Des Moines Home for Friendless Orphans, Des Moines, Ia. Incorporated 1884. Opened for inmates 1882. Secretary, Mrs. E. A. Carter, 1437 Woodland Avenue, Des Moines, Ia. Number of beds, 50; number of patients treated during the past year, 12. Delegate, Alexander M. Linn, M. D.
 The Home for the Aged in the State of Iowa, Des Moines, Ia. Incorporated 1896. Opened for inmates 1896. Executive officer, Mrs. Sarah M. Dickenson, Des Moines, Ia. Number of beds, 80; number of patients treated during the past year, 47. Supported by membership fees, contributions and endowment funds. Attending physician, Erwin Schenck, M. D. Lucy B. Harback, M. D., delegate.
 Kansas.
 The Soldiers’ Orphan Home, Atchison, Kansas. Opened for inmates 1887. Not incorporated. Superintendent, Edward C. Willis, Atchison, Kan. Number of beds, 200. Supported by state appropriation. This is not a hospital, but a home for dependent and neglected children, who are residents of the state. We keep them until they are fitted, in a way, and then find homes for them.
 Maryland.
 Baltimore City Jail, Baltimore, Md. We have not been able to obtain a report from this institution for a number of years. As last reported, James C. Clarke, M. D., 1201 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md., was the physician in attendance.
 Minnesota.
 Washbourne Memorial Asylum, Minneapolis, Minn. Opened for patients 1886. Incorporated 1883. Executive officer, Charles J. Martin, Chamber of Commerce Building, Minneapolis, Minn. Number of beds, can be varied from 98 to 117. Number of children cared for last year, 40. Supported by bequest of the founder, Governor Cadwallader C. Washbourne, amounting to $4,080.
 Church Home of Minnesota for Aged and Infirm Women, St. Paul, Minn. Opened for inmates 1896. Not incorporated. Executive officer, Reverend Theodore Sedgwick, 563 Ashland Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. Number of beds, 20. Supported by fees, board of inmates, voluntary contributions and contribution of churches throughout the diocese.
 New Jersey.
 Bethany Home for the Aged, Irvington, N. J. Opened for inmates 1900. Incorporated 1901. Executive officer, Carl Hermann Wintsch, M. D., 188 Fairmount Avenue, Newark, N. J. Number of beds, 6 in hospital, 80 in home. Number of patients treated last year, 70. Supported by voluntary contributions. Delegate, Carl Hermann Wintsch, M. D.
 Baptist Home for the Aged, 285 Roseville Avenue, Newark, N. J. Incorporated 1891. Opened for inmates 1891. Secretary, Mrs. A. B. Johnson, 62 Hollywood Avenue, East Orange, N. J. Number of beds, 33; number of patients treated during the last year, 8. Supported by individual subscriptions and collections from the Baptist churches in New Jersey. Attending physician, Henry J. Anderson, M. D., 4 Orange Place, Newark, N. J.
 Newark Orphan Asylum, Newark, N. J. We know nothing about this institution, as we have received no report from it for several years. The attending physician is Henry J. Anderson, M. D., 4 Orange Place, Newark, N. J.
 Children’s Home, Plainfield, N. J. Incorporated 1877. Opened for patients 1877. Executive officer, Mrs. Horace Kimball, Plainfield, N. J. Number of beds, 40; number of patients treated during the past year, 17. Supported by legacies, donations and membership fees. Attending physician, D. C. Adams, M. D.
 New York.
 Albany House of Shelter, Albany, N. Y. Incorporated 1869. Opened for inmates 1868. Secretary, Robert C. James, Albany, N. Y. Number of beds, 35. Supported by invested funds and donations.
 Ingleside Home, 70 Harvard Place, Buffalo, N. Y. Incorporated 1860. Opened for patients 1868. Executive officer, Mrs. W. B. Moore, 162 Hichland Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. Number of beds, 70; number of patients treated last year, approximately, 250. Supported by voluntary contributions. This is a home for fallen women. Delegate, George R. Stearns, M. D.
 Asylum for Half Orphan and Destitute Children, 110 Manhattan Avenue, New York, N. Y. Incorporated 1835. Opened for inmates 1835. Executive officer, Mrs. James R. Wheeler, 433 West One Hundred and Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. Number of beds, 200; number of beds in infirmary, 10. There have been no cases of illness requiring the attention of a physician during the year. Supported by an endowment fund and voluntary contribution.
 Hospital of the Five Points House of Industry, 155 Worth Street, New York, N. Y. Incorporated 1854. Opened for inmates 1880. Superintendent, William D. Garbutt, 155 Worth Street, New York, N. Y. Number of beds, 75. Supported by city appropriation, donations and voluntary contributions.
 Ohio.
 Home for the Friendless and Foundlings, Cincinnati, O. Incorporated 1860. Opened for inmates 1855. Executive officer, Mr. James A. Green, Treasurer; Mr. Allen Collier, Clerk, Cincinnati, O. Number of beds, 50; number of patients treated during the past year, 430 adults, 151 infants, 47 obstetrical cases. Supported by voluntary contributions and endowments. Delegate, Charles E. Walton, M. D.
 Eliza Jennings’ Home for Incurables, Cleveland, O. Opened for inmates 1868. Not incorporated. Executive officer, Mrs. Charles Presley, 1899 East Seventy-ninth Street, Cleveland, O. Number of beds, 26. Supported by donations and board of inmates. Attending physician, George R. Wilkins, M. D.
 Home for Aged Women, Cleveland, O. Executive officer, Miss Temple, 2206 East Forty-sixth Street, Cleveland, O. Number of beds, 60. Supported by donations and annuities of patients. Attending physician, J. Richey Horner, M. D. The inmates are privileged to have their own physician if they wish it. The attending physician has made, during the year, about 300 prescriptions.
 Ohio Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphans’ Home, Xenia, O. Opened for inmates 1870. Not incorporated. Superintendent, Col. E. D. Sawyer, Xenia, O. Number of beds, 750 in home, 85 in hospital; number of patients treated in hospital, 810; number of prescriptions made, 3,000. Supported by state appropriations. Delegate, Warren C. Hewitt, M. D.
 McGregor Home, Cleveland, O. A home for aged persons, single or married. Opened recently. Built and in part endowed from the estate of the late A. M. McGregor. Capacity, about 50. Executive officer, Mrs. Patton, Lee Road, East Cleveland, O. Delegate, Geo. H. Quay, M. D.
 Oregon.
 Children’s Home, Portland, Oregon. Executive officer, Mrs. Ella G. Hughes, Portland, Oregon. Number of beds, 100; number of patients treated during the past year, 53. Supported by endowment fund, subscriptions and board of children. Delegate, Henry C. Jefferds, M. D.
 Cincinnati Orphan Asylum, Cincinnati, O. Incorporated 1833. Opened for inmates 1833. Executive officer, Mrs. Ralph Sellen. Number of beds in asylum, 52; number of beds in hospital, 20. Supported by endowment fund. Attending physician, H. H. Wiggers, M. D. The cottage hospital is separate from the asylum building, and devoted exclusively to orphan asylum needs. No child is ever sent out to a city hospital for treatment. They have recorded but 3 deaths in 10 years.
 Pennsylvania.
 Boys’ Boarding House, Allegheny, Pa. Opened for inmates 1870. We know nothing about this institution as we have had no report from it for several years. As last reported, the executive officer was Mrs. D. M. Ure, 1917 Western Avenue, Allegheny, Pa.
 Western Home for Women, 423 Locust Street, Allegheny, Pa. Incorporated 1868. Opened for patients 1868. Executive officer, Mrs. Joseph Horner, 910 Sherman Avenue, Allegheny, Pittsburgh, Pa. Number of beds, 30. Supported by state appropriation and endowment fund. Attending physician, Harvey E. Ramsey, M. D.
 Florence Crittenden Home, Scranton, Pa. Incorporated 1894. Opened for inmates 1894. Executive officer, Mrs. F. B. Foote, 1021 Ridge Row, Scranton, Pa. Number of beds, 40; number of patients treated during the last year, 100. Supported by work of inmates, state aid and voluntary contributions. Attending physician, Anna C. Clark, M. D.
 Florence Crittenden Home and Rescue Association, Pittsburgh, Pa. M. D., Pittsburgh, Pa. Number of beds, 16; number of patients treated, 100. Supported by voluntary contribution.
 Pittsburgh Sunshine Children’s Home, Pittsburgh, Pa. President, Mrs. Robert D. Coard, Pittsburgh, Pa. Incorporated 1907. Opened for patients 1906. Number of beds, 31; number of patients treated last year, 365. Supported by voluntary contributions.
 St. Barnabas Free Home, McKeesport, Pa. Incorporated 1900. Opened for patients 1900. Executive officer, Mr. G. P. Haner. Number of beds, 100. Supported by voluntary contributions.
 Convent of Benedictine Sisters, 327 East Ninth Street, Erie, Pa. Opened for inmates 1865. Executive officer, Mother Superior, 322 East Minot Street, Erie, Pa. Number of beds, 10; number of patients treated during the past year, 114. Supported by voluntary contributions. Attending physician, Edward Cranch, M. D.
 Rhode Island.
 Children’s Friend Society (Tobey Street Home), Providence, R. I. Opened for inmates 1835. Executive officer, Mrs. Cora Sawyer, 23 Tobey Street, Providence, R. I. Number of beds, 70; number of patients treated during the past year, 75. Supported by voluntary contributions and income from investment funds. Attending physician, Robert S. Phillips, M. D. This is not a hospital proper, but a home for children, between 3 and 12 years of age. Must be in good health for admission. Medical supervision has been homoeopathic for 35 years past.
 Providence Rescue Home and Mission, Providence, R. I. Opened for inmates 1895. Secretary, Frank F. Tingley, M. D., 75 Westminster Street, Providence, R. I. Number of beds, 16. Supported by donations and voluntary contributions. Young girls of a wayward class are admitted, one-fourth of the cases being maternity cases. 

Dr.Devendra Kumar MD(Homeo)
International Homeopathic Consultant at Ushahomeopathy
I am a Homeopathic Physician. I am practicing Homeopathy since 20 years. I treat all kinds of Chronic and Acute complaints with Homeopathic Medicines. Even Emergency conditions can be treated with Homeopathy if case is properly managed. know more about me and my research on my blog https://www.homeoresearch.com/about-me/
Dr.Devendra Kumar MD(Homeo) on EmailDr.Devendra Kumar MD(Homeo) on FacebookDr.Devendra Kumar MD(Homeo) on GoogleDr.Devendra Kumar MD(Homeo) on LinkedinDr.Devendra Kumar MD(Homeo) on RssDr.Devendra Kumar MD(Homeo) on TwitterDr.Devendra Kumar MD(Homeo) on Wordpress