– American Institute of Homoeopathy, 1910, 65th Session,

NYMCVosburghPavilion Homoeopathic medical colleges in United States

Hahnemann Medical College of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal. Incorporated 1883. Opened for students 1882. Dean, James W. Ward, M. D., 391 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Length of each yearly course, 34 weeks, commencing August 11, 1900. Number of courses required for graduation, four; number of students in attendance the past year, 23; number of graduates at last commencement, 7; number of alumni belonging to the school, 202; number in faculty, 36; number of professors, 23; number of lecturers, 13. Value of college and lands $22,000. Amount of endowment, $1,250. Delegates, James W. Ward, M. D., H. R. Arndt, M. D.
 Westminster University College of Medicine, Denver, Col. Incorporated 1894. Open for students 1894. Dean, Joseph B. Kinley, M. D., 1440 Glenarm Street, Denver, Col. Length of each yearly course, thirty-four weeks, beginning September of each year. Number of courses for graduation, four; number of students in attendance last year, 46; number of graduates at last commencement, 6; number of alumni belonging to the school, 93; number in faculty, 36; number of professors, 28; number of lecturers, 8. Value of college buildings and lands, $35,000. Delegates, Joseph B. Kinley, M. D., Grant S. Peck, M. D.
 Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital of Chicago, Ill. Incorporated 1855. Opened for students 1859. Dean, Howard R. Chislett, M. D., 3604 Grand Boulevard, Chicago, Ill. Length of each yearly course, eight months, beginning last Tuesday in September in each year. Number of courses required for graduation, four; number of students in attendance the past year, 130; number of graduates at last commencement, 25; number of alumni belonging to the school, 4 200; number in faculty, 82; number of professors, 37; number of associate professors, 5; number of adjunct professors, 19; number of lecturers, 10; number of assistants and demonstrators, 11. Value of college building and lands, $25,000. Amount of endowment, $45,000. Delegates, Dr. W. Henry Wilson, Dr. C. Gurnee Fellows.
 Hering Medical College and Hospital of Chicago, Ill. Incorporated 1892. Opened for students 1892. Dean, Robert N. Morris, M. D., R1002, 72 Madison Street, Chicago, Ill. Length of each yearly course, 32 weeks, commencing in September of each year; number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance the past year, 38; number of graduates at last commencement, 10; number of alumni belonging to the school, 355; number in faculty, 48; number of professors, 27; number of lecturers, 16. Value of buildings and land, $50,000. Delegate, R. N. Morris, M. D.
 College of Homoeopathic Medicine of the State University of Iowa, Iowa City, Ia. First opened to students 1877. Dean, George Royal, M. D., Good Block, Des Moines, Ia. Length of each yearly course, thirty-six weeks, commencing in September of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance during the past year, 43; number of graduates at last commencement, 7; number of alumni belonging to the school, 364; number in faculty, 25; number of professors, 15; number of lecturers, 19. Delegates, Frederick J. Becker, M. D., W. T. Bywater, M. D.
 Southwestern Homoeopathic College, Louisville, Ky. Incorporated 1892. Opened for students 1893. Dean, George S. Coon, M. D., Gaston Building, Louisville, Ky. Length of each yearly course, 7 months, commencing about October first of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance during the past year, 13; number of graduates at last commencement, 3; number of alumni belonging to the school, 90; number of faculty, 27; number of professors, 15; number of lecturers, 12. Value of college buildings and land, $75,000. Delegates, George S. Coon, M. D., F. C. Askenstedt, M. D.
 Atlantic Medical College, Baltimore, Md. Dean, Eldridge C. Price, M. D., 1012 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. College incorporated 1890. Opened for students 1891. Length of each yearly course, eight months, commencing about October first of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance during the past year, 42; number of graduates at last commencement, 25; number of alumni belonging to the school, 175; number in faculty, 46; number of professors, 12; number of lecturers, 34. Value of college buildings and land, $22,000. Delegates, Eldridge C. Price, M. D., E. Z. Cole, M. D.
 Boston University School of Medicine. Opened for students 1873. Dean, John Preston Sutherland, M. D., 302 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Length of yearly course, eight months, beginning about October of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4, examination in 49 subjects; number of students in attendance last year, 95; number of graduates at last commencement, 18; number of alumni belonging to the school, 1,020; number in faculty, 64; number of professors, 24; number of associate professors, lecturers and assistant lecturers, 44. Estimated value of buildings and land, $200,000. Amount of endowment, $48,000. Delegates, John P. Sutherland, M. D., Frank C. Richardson, M. D.
 Homoeopathic Department of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Incorporated 1875. Opened for students 1875. Dean, Wilbert D. Hinsdale, M. D., M. S., Ann Arbor, Mich. Length of each yearly course, nine and one-half months, commencing in the first week in October. Number of courses required for graduation, 4, with an optional fifth; number of students in attendance in the past year, 90; number of graduates at last commencement, 23; number of alumni belonging to the school, 600; number in faculty, 30; number of professors, 15; number of lecturers, 15. Estimated value of college building and land, $500,000. Delegates, Wilbert B. Hinsdale, M. D., M. S., W. A. Dewey, M. D.
 Detroit Homoeopathic Medical College, Detroit, Mich. Incorporated 1871. Opened for students 1871. Dean, Daniel A. MacLachlan, M. D., 1301 Majestic Building, Detroit, Mich. Length of yearly course, eight months commencing the second week in September of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance for the last year, 33; number of graduates at last commencement, 7; number in faculty, 38; number of professors, 16; number of lecturers, 22. Estimated value of college buildings and land, $60,000. Delegates, Dr. S. H. Knight, Dr. D. A. MacLachlan.
 College of Homoeopathic Medicine and Surgery of the University of Minnesota. Dean, Eugene L. Mann, M. D., 694 Endicott Arcade, St. Paul, Minn. Length of each yearly course, thirty-six weeks, commencing in September of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students during the past year, 3; number of graduates at last commencement, number of alumni belonging to the school, 89; number in faculty, 44; number of professors, 26. Delegates, Eugene L. Mann, M. D., Oscar K. Richardson, M. D. An entrance qualification of two years of college work is required.
 Kansas City Hahnemann Medical College of the Kansas City University. Incorporated 1884. Opened for students 1884. Dean, Wm. E. Cramer, M. D., 1103 Main Street. Kansas City, Mo. Length of each yearly course, 36 weeks. Opens September of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance last year, 45; number of graduates at last commencement, 14; number of alumni, 250; number in faculty, 44; number of professors, 36; number of lecturers, 18. Delegate, L. B. Greene, M. D., Registrar, 819-21 Keith and Perry Building, Kansas City, Mo.
 Homoeopathic Medical College of Missouri, St. Louis, Mo. Incorporated 1857. Opened for students 1857. Dean, D. M. Gibson, M. D., 2540 Howard Street, St. Louis, Mo. Length of each yearly course 7 months, commencing about September 10th of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance the past year, 11; number of graduates at last commencement, 2; number of alumni belonging to school, 750; number in faculty, 32; number of professors, 20; number of lecturers, 12. Value of college buildings and land, $30,000. Delegate, L. Claude McElwee.
 New York Homoeopathic Medical College and Hospital. New York, N. Y. Incorporated 1860. Opened for students 1860. Dean, Royal S. Copeland, M. D., 58 Central Park, West, New York, N. Y. Length of each yearly course, eight months, commencing about October first of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students the past year, 112; number of graduates at last commencement, 18; number of alumni belonging to the school, 1,200; number of faculty, 80; number of professors, 32; number of lecturers, 20. Estimated value of college buildings and lands, $1,000,000. Amount of endowment, $600,000. Delegates, Royal S. Copeland, M. D., John W. Dowling, M. D.
 New York Medical College for Women, New York, N. Y. Incorporated 1863. Opened for students 1863. Dean, Helen Cooley Palmer, M. D., 253 West One Hundred and Third Street, New York, N. Y. Length of yearly course thirty weeks commencing about October first of each year. Number of course required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance the past year, 26; number of graduates at last commencement, 4; number of alumni belonging to the school, about 350; number of professors, 30; number of lecturers, 11. Value of college building and land, $130,000. Delegates, Helen Cooley Palmer, M. D., Emily C. Charles, M. D.
 Cleveland Homoeopathic Medical College, Cleveland, O. Opened for students, 1850. Dean, George H. Quay, 820 Rose Building, Cleveland, O. Length of yearly course, eight months, commencing the last week in September of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance last year, 46; number of graduates at last commencement, 14; number of alumni belonging to the school, 2,564; number in faculty, 69; number of professors, 29; number of lecturers, 40; Estimated value of building and lands, $168,000. Delegate, George H. Quay, M. D.
 Pulte Medical College, Cincinnati, O. Opened for students, 1878. Dean, Chas E. Walton, M. D., 8th and Johns Streets, Cincinnati, O. Length of each yearly course, eight months, commencing the last Wednesday in September of each year. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance last year, 16; number of graduates at last commencement, 4; number of alumni belonging to the school, 668; number in faculty, 37; number of professors, 24; number of lecturers, 13. Value of college building and land, $20,000. Amount of endowment, $25,000. Delegates, Charles E. Walton, M. D., S. R. Geiser, M. D.
 Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia, Pa., Incorporated 1848. Opened for students 1848. Dean, Herbert L. Northrop, M. D., Flanders Building, Philadelphia, Pa. Length of each yearly course, eight months, commencing September 27, 1909. Number of courses required for graduation, 4; number of students in attendance last year, 181; number of graduates at last commencement, 57; number of alumni, 2,994; number of faculty, 69; number of professors, 28; number of lecturers, 41. Value of college building and land, $1,250,000. Amount of endowment, $5,000. Annual income, $34,000. Delegate, J. J. Tuller, M. D. 

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2 Thoughts to “Homoeopathic medical colleges in United States”

  1. It is said, History Repeats Again; it is going to be true in India
    The 22th Dec. 2011 was a black-day for the whole Indian Homœopathic fraternity. As per Indian constitution, in order to make a Law, the ministry of health and family welfare submitted a bill in the Loke shbha and Rajya sabha. In this proposed bill, the ministry of health and family welfare as well as AYUS both, tried to keep the Indian system of medicine (Ayurveda) and Homœopathy out of the ambit of the bill. What does it implicates? It was a planned attempt to obliterate both systems of medicine from India. It is nothing but the intellectual terrorism that tried to fall victim these systems of medicine. It was strongly opposed by the several members of the both houses. Consequently, after four days of serious discussion on 26th Dec. 2011 an outstanding committee of the 31 members (21 from Lok sabha and 10 from Rajya shbha) was formed under the chairmanship of Shri. Brajesh Pathak to look into the matter of fact. After hearing all the views of concerned parties, including several eminent physicians as well as views of state the governments, the committee submitted his report in the house. It would be here noteworthy that, in order to express the concern of Maharashtra Govt. on the issue, our Govt. sent a clerical level person before the outstanding committee instead of secretarial level personal. As a result this, committee kick-out that person without hearing concern of this well-developed state and taken his decision. Be informed, the maximum number of Homœopathic colleges do exist in Maharashtra. In front of world Homœopathic community, a great shameful event occurred due to negligence act of Maharashtra Govt..
    This report was submitted under the heading “DEPARTMENT-RELATED PARLIAMENTARY STANDING COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND FAMILY WELFARE ON SIXTIETH REPORT ON THE NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH BILL, 2011. (MINISTRY OF HEALTH AND FAMILY WELFARE). The committee pointed out in its report that: “The Committee notes that the medical education and healthcare under AYUSH has not been brought under the Bill. Departments of Health and Family Welfare and Department of AYUSH desired to keep the Indian Systems of Medicine and Homoeopathy out of the ambit of the present Bill on the ground that the Allopathy and the Indian Systems of Medicine and Homoeopathy are completely different and the latter needs focused attention for proper development.” It’s my humble appeal to all my brethren again, wakeup now and get updated; otherwise much more strong attempts of such kinds to may be done by the intellectual society in order to make victim our fraternity and obliterate our existence. The Natural law ‘survival of the fittest’ applies to all states of affairs.
    Name: DR. S. HARIMANN.
    Dist: NAGPUR. (MS)
    Mob: +91-09270077592
    email: dr_sharimann@yahoo.co.in

  2. The History of ups-and-downs of Homœopathy
    In the 19th century, the Homœopathy was very popular in America and it was taught at the Boston University and Universities of Michigan, Minnesota and Iowa. Dr. John Franklin Gray (1804–1882) was the first practitioner of Homœopathy who begun his practice in the year 1828 in the New York City. The first school of Homœopathy was opened in 1830 and within the 19th century several institutions was became evident in the Europe as well as United States. By the year 1900 AD, there were twenty-two Homœopathic colleges in the United States and 15,000 practitioners. There were 22 Homœopathic journals were being published by end of century. One of the main reason behind its popularity was its evident success in the treatment of infectious diseases in epidemics. During the 19th century, when the epidemics of cholera was prevalent, death rate in Homœopathic hospitals was much lesser than that of the in conventional hospitals. In the year 1844 AD, the American Institute of Homeopathy was founded. It was the first American national medical society.
    Looking at the growth of Homœopathy, by the officials of clinical methodology and pharmacology of conventional medicine, an issue was raised stating that the Homœopathy is founded on the philosophical basis. On this issue, they opposed the Homœopathic practice. With one of their first objectives, to combat Homœopathy, in the year 1846, the American Medical Association AMA was came into existence. The Homœopaths were not allowed to become member of AMA as well as AMA members were not granted to even consult Homœopaths; otherwise they have to face expulsion from the association. There was no legal recognition to the graduates with diplomas from the universities. As per Flexner Report, a classification of the American medical schools was outlined in the year 1910 AD. Obviously, the high ratings was given to the only those schools that were emphasizing physicochemical and pathological approaches to the human body; while Homœopathic approach (9,19,20,28) was strongly penalized. Naturally, the Homœopathic colleges got poor rating. Consequently, the graduates from only high ratings schools could get recognition for their qualification. It proved a mortal blow to the Homœopathy. As a result this, out of 29 Homœopathic colleges in 1900, there were only two Homœopathic Colleges remained in 1923 in America. By the 1950 AD, there was not a single school of Homœopathy remained in America. The last school exclusively teaching Homœopathy in the United States was closed in the year 1920. The whole Homœopathic fraternity was fallen prey to the intellectual terrorism. It was estimated that, only about hundred practicing Homœopaths and almost all over 50 years of age were practicing throughout the country. Similarly, in Europe, at the early decades of 19th century, there was a parallel decline of Homœopathy. The entire episode of downfall of Homœopathy cannot to be said; however, only due to political and/or economic reasons. Methinks, at least two factors played a decisive role in entire happenings. Besides major pharmacological discoveries in the conventional medicine as well as new scientific approaches, the internal struggles within the Homœopathic fraternity itself were one of them. The disputes over the potencies (high or low) between the various schools as well as single or multiple prescriptions and/or whether prescription should be based on total symptoms similarities or onto the only main expressions of the diseases, was the second reason behind bifurcation within the Homœopathic fraternity. As a result of this, various schools developed their own organizations, hospitals and journals. For the new aspirants, interested in learning Homœopathy, it was became very difficult to get into this field. Even serious physicians was also got confused that what to do with this situation. Consequently, the downfall of Homœopathy was become much evident and faster.

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